Dalí & Raphael in the Catalogue Raisonné

Andrea Bonet, Anna Garcia, Anna Massot (Educational Service)

'[...] - and who knows if someday I shall not without intending it be considered the Raphael of my period?'

Salvador Dalí, 50 Secrets of Magic Craftsmanship, 1948

We invite you to immerse yourself in this thrilling Dalinian world by browsing through some of Salvador Dalí's raphaelesque works, in the Catalogue Raisonné of paintings and the essential companion of his writings. Read more

  • Self-Portrait with Raphaelesque Neck
    © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres, 2018

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    103
    Year:
    c. 1921
    Tecnique:
    Oil on canvas
    Dimensions:
    40.5 x 53 cm
    Collection:
    Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres

    From a very young age, Salvador Dalí had been a great admirer of the Renaissance painter Raphael Sanzio (1483-1520), who he considered an almost divine genius, exalted and venerated in his own time as one of the finest painters of the period. Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 103

    Obres de referència

    Self-Portrait

    Su concessione del Ministerio dei Beni e le Attività Culturali. La riproduzione, copia totale o parziale, duplicazione della immagine è espressamente vietata

    Self-portrait, 1506
    Galleria degli Uffizi, Firenze

    Dalí Dixit

    'I had let my hair grow as long as a girl's and looking at myself in the mirror I would often adopt the pose and the melancholy look which so fascinated me in Raphael's self-portrait, and whom I should have liked to resemble as much as possible. I was also waiting impatiently for the down of my face to grow, so that I could shave and have long side-whiskers. As soon as possible I wanted to make myself "look unusual", to compose a masterpiece with my head; [...]'

    Salvador Dalí, The Secret Life of Salvador Dalí, 1942

    'I need the localism of Portlligat just as Raphael needed the landscape of Urbino, to arrive at the universal by the path of what is particular.'

    Salvador Dalí, José María Massip, «Dalí, hoy», Destino, 1/04/1950.

    Educa Dalí

    The young Dalí sought to give his appearance an unusual character, and to do so he took inspiration from Raphael. Later on he would adopt odd poses and behave strangely to attract attention and make himself visible. As a young man his sideburns gave him this odd appearance, while later his famous moustache would become his trademark.

    Look at this literary portrait written by Dalí and then try your hand at creating your own.

    A portrait of Salvador Dalí

    Most Admired Old Masters: Raphael and Velasquez.

    Most Admired Contemporaries: Picasso and I.

    My Most Provocative Painting: "Debris of an Automobile Giving Birth to a Blind Horse Biting a Telephone".

    Definition of Surrealism : Le surréalisme, c'est moi.

    Favorite Color: Absinthe green.

    Most Pressing Project: To perfect for the United Nations a system of camouflage based on my radical theory of indivisibility.

    Favorite Exercise: Riding up- but not down- in an elevator.

    Note to Architects: Your designs are too harsh, too mechanistic - you should cater to man's desire to return to his pre-natal abode by utilizing rounded, non-rigid forms and soft protective materials.

    Thought in Passing: Aviation is the most spectacular expression of the sexual instinct.

    Proudest Symbol: The sign on my sleeping chamber: "POET WORKING".

    Chief Hope for the Future: A religious renaissance based on a progressive form of Catholicism.

    Publicat a Esquire , XVIII, n. 2, Nova York, agost del 1942

    For further information

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    103
    Year:
    c. 1921
    Tecnique:
    Oil on canvas
    Dimensions:
    40.5 x 53 cm
    Collection:
    Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres

    From a very young age, Salvador Dalí had been a great admirer of the Renaissance painter Raphael Sanzio (1483-1520), who he considered an almost divine genius, exalted and venerated in his own time as one of the finest painters of the period. Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 103

    Dalí Dixit

    'I had let my hair grow as long as a girl's and looking at myself in the mirror I would often adopt the pose and the melancholy look which so fascinated me in Raphael's self-portrait, and whom I should have liked to resemble as much as possible. I was also waiting impatiently for the down of my face to grow, so that I could shave and have long side-whiskers. As soon as possible I wanted to make myself "look unusual", to compose a masterpiece with my head; [...]'

    Salvador Dalí, The Secret Life of Salvador Dalí, 1942

    'I need the localism of Portlligat just as Raphael needed the landscape of Urbino, to arrive at the universal by the path of what is particular.'

    Salvador Dalí, José María Massip, «Dalí, hoy», Destino, 1/04/1950.

    For further information

  • Poetry of America
    © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres, 2018

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    577
    Year:
    1943
    Tecnique:
    Oil on canvas
    Dimensions:
    116 x 79 cm
    Collection:
    Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres

    In the United States, after his surrealist period in the 1930s and various trips with Gala to Italy, where they were awestruck by the classical architecture and paintings, Salvador Dalí painted Poetry of America. Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 577

    Obres de referència

    The Marriage of the Virgin

    Pinacoteca di Brera, Milano - Ministero per i Beni e le Attività Culturali

    The Marriage of the Virgin, 1504
    Pinacoteca di Brera, Milano

    Dalí Dixit

    'One perceived then that this armchair was surrounded by the greatest artistic treasures in the world. Raphael's Betrothal of the Virgin, from the Museum of Milan, Leonardo's Virgin of the Rocks... Piles of the rarest and most priceless manuscripts, and over there, behind him, in the half-light in the center of the room, the Victory of Samothrace- the real one, the one from the Louvre museum, but looking in this horrible rigid room like a bad reproduction.'

    Salvador Dalí, Hidden Faces, 1944

    "Gala became the impregnable castle that she had never ceased to be. Intimacy and, above all, familiarity, diminish all passions. Sentimental rigour and distance, as demonstrated by the neurotic ceremony of courtly love, make passion grow. Thus, I remember that, after a long silence before Raphael's The Marriage of the Virgin, in the museum of Milan, Gala sighed and said: 'What an honour never to have known any member of Raphael's family. Imagine what a catastrophe it would be to be introduced to Raphael's aunt, albeit a distant one'".

    Salvador Dalí, Le point de vue de Dalí, Vogue, n. 522, Paris, 12/1971 – 01/1972

    Educa Dalí

    Even though Dalí looked up to the Renaissance masters, in Poetry of America we can see how ahead of his time he was by incorporating a bottle of Coca-Cola into his painting.

    Try being like Dalí and add some new elements in a collage on one of your works. You will obtain totally new and original compositions. Try the same experiment on one of Raphael's works and compare them.

    For further information

    • Fèlix Fanés. DALÍ. Cultura de Masses. Fundació La Caixa: Barcelona; Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí: Figueres; Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía: Madrid, 2004, p. 43.

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    577
    Year:
    1943
    Tecnique:
    Oil on canvas
    Dimensions:
    116 x 79 cm
    Collection:
    Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres

    In the United States, after his surrealist period in the 1930s and various trips with Gala to Italy, where they were awestruck by the classical architecture and paintings, Salvador Dalí painted Poetry of America. Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 577

    Dalí Dixit

    'One perceived then that this armchair was surrounded by the greatest artistic treasures in the world. Raphael's Betrothal of the Virgin, from the Museum of Milan, Leonardo's Virgin of the Rocks... Piles of the rarest and most priceless manuscripts, and over there, behind him, in the half-light in the center of the room, the Victory of Samothrace- the real one, the one from the Louvre museum, but looking in this horrible rigid room like a bad reproduction.'

    Salvador Dalí, Hidden Faces, 1944

    "Gala became the impregnable castle that she had never ceased to be. Intimacy and, above all, familiarity, diminish all passions. Sentimental rigour and distance, as demonstrated by the neurotic ceremony of courtly love, make passion grow. Thus, I remember that, after a long silence before Raphael's The Marriage of the Virgin, in the museum of Milan, Gala sighed and said: 'What an honour never to have known any member of Raphael's family. Imagine what a catastrophe it would be to be introduced to Raphael's aunt, albeit a distant one'".

    Salvador Dalí, Le point de vue de Dalí, Vogue, n. 522, Paris, 12/1971 – 01/1972

    For further information

    • Fèlix Fanés. DALÍ. Cultura de Masses. Fundació La Caixa: Barcelona; Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí: Figueres; Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía: Madrid, 2004, p. 43.
  • Galarina

    Galarina

    1945

    Galarina
    © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres, 2018

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    597
    Year:
    1945
    Tecnique:
    Oil on Canvas
    Dimensions:
    64 x 50 cm
    Collection:
    Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres

    Dalí and Gala lived in the United States for eight years, between New York and California. They arrived in 1940, fleeing from the Second World War. In 1941, Dalí exhibited at the Julien Levy Gallery in New York. Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 597

    Obres de referència

    La Fornarina

    Per gentile concessione di Gallerie Nazionale di Arte Antica. Foto di Mauro Coen.

    La Fornarina, c. 1520
    Gallerie Nazionali - Palazzo Barberini, Roma

    Educa Dalí

    During the Renaissance period, artists were mainly commissioned to produce specific works. However, this is not the case of La Fornarina, which Raphael created for himself during the final years of his life.

    The model in this painting is posed like a Venus pudica, one of the most commonly used artistic motifs during classical antiquity, in which Venus attempts to cover her breasts and pubis, a gesture that actually draws the viewer to focus, precisely, on what the model is trying to hide. We can see the Fornarina trying to lightly cover one breast, while Gala, in contrast, reveals one and hides the other beneath her blouse. Both women are wearing a bracelet, a symbol of union and a love bond, in the shape of a serpent in Gala's case and, in the Fornarina's, engraved with the name of the painter, Raphael Urbinas. Dalí linkened Gala's bare breast to the hunk of bread in his work The Basket of Bread from the same year.

    For further information

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    597
    Year:
    1945
    Tecnique:
    Oil on Canvas
    Dimensions:
    64 x 50 cm
    Collection:
    Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres

    Dalí and Gala lived in the United States for eight years, between New York and California. They arrived in 1940, fleeing from the Second World War. In 1941, Dalí exhibited at the Julien Levy Gallery in New York. Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 597

    For further information

  • Exploding raphaelesque head
    © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres, 2018

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    661
    Year:
    1951
    Tecnique:
    Oil on canvas
    Dimensions:
    43.2 x 33.1 cm
    Collection:
    Scottish National Gallery, Edimburg

    From a very young age, Dalí showed a great interest in the world of science, and his library contained many books on physics, quantum mechanics and mathematics. Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 661

    Obres de referència

    Pantheon di Agrippa

    Dome of the Pantheon of Agrippa. Photo Wikiarquitectura.cat

    Pantheon, Rome

    Dalí Dixit

    “S.R. Do you think that the painters you admire like Vermeer and Raphael were learned in the scientific knowledge of their times?

    S.D. Raphael knew about every scientific mathematical achievement of his time. Don't forget that it was the period of Luca Pacioli”

    Selden Rodman, Salvador Dalí, “Dalí The Great?”, Controversy, Philadelphia, 31/05/1959

    "The Renaissance cupolas that corresponded to the cupola of heaven in a flash of genius appear to me as the receptacles of conscience. I go back to that theme in Tête raphaelesque explosant (Raphaelesque Head Exploding) and express a transcendent metaphysical message in my Mystic Manifesto.'

    André Parinaud, Salvador Dalí Comment on devient Dalí, 1973.

    Educa Dalí

    The Renaissance, as the name indicates, was a period of rebirth of a society that was slowly abandoning Medieval ways of thinking -based much more on theocentric concepts- to begin to view knowledge from an anthropocentric perspective. Human beings became the centre of the universe, rather than God: humanist thought appeared and the modern age was born.

    In the field of art, painting progressed to represent reality in a much more plausible manner; for this reason, techniques of perspective gained greater relevance. It was an important moment for treatises on painting and architecture, which Dalí read eagerly. One of the most renowned texts from this period is The Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects, by Giorgio Vasari, published in 1550, which contains the biographies of figures such as Raphael, who Vasari called "the divine".

    For further information

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    661
    Year:
    1951
    Tecnique:
    Oil on canvas
    Dimensions:
    43.2 x 33.1 cm
    Collection:
    Scottish National Gallery, Edimburg

    From a very young age, Dalí showed a great interest in the world of science, and his library contained many books on physics, quantum mechanics and mathematics. Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 661

    Dalí Dixit

    “S.R. Do you think that the painters you admire like Vermeer and Raphael were learned in the scientific knowledge of their times?

    S.D. Raphael knew about every scientific mathematical achievement of his time. Don't forget that it was the period of Luca Pacioli”

    Selden Rodman, Salvador Dalí, “Dalí The Great?”, Controversy, Philadelphia, 31/05/1959

    "The Renaissance cupolas that corresponded to the cupola of heaven in a flash of genius appear to me as the receptacles of conscience. I go back to that theme in Tête raphaelesque explosant (Raphaelesque Head Exploding) and express a transcendent metaphysical message in my Mystic Manifesto.'

    André Parinaud, Salvador Dalí Comment on devient Dalí, 1973.

    For further information

  • Maximum speed of Raphael’s Madonna
    © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres, 2018

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    683
    Year:
    c. 1954
    Tecnique:
    Oil on Canvas
    Dimensions:
    81 x 66 cm
    Collection:
    Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid

    To feed his passionate interest in science that we have mentioned, Dalí took out subscriptions to different scientific journals which kept him up-to-date with all the various studies that were conducted in his day. Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 683

    Obres de referència

    Madonna of the Goldfinch

    Su concessione del Ministerio dei Beni e le Attività Culturali. La riproduzione, copia totale o parziale, duplicazione della immagine è espressamente vietata.

    Madonna of the Goldfinch, 1507
    Galleria degli Uffizi, Firenze

    Dalí Dixit

    “The atomic explosion of August 6, 1945 shook me seismically. Thenceforth, the atom was my favorite food for thought. Many of the landscapes painted in this period express the great fear inspired in me by the announcement of that explosion.”

    André Parinaud, Salvador Dalí Comment on devient Dalí, 1973.

    “Galatea the Galanymph of pure and gigantic marine geology, is slowly but ineluctably taking shape in the Raphaelite-nuclear impulse of my next and brilliant painting.”

    Salvador Dalí Journal d’un génie. La Table Ronde, Paris, 1964.

    Educa Dalí

    Atomic theories surprised and inspired Dalí to the extent that he turned his work around completely, with his style becoming known thereafter as Nuclear Mysticism. The mysticism of the classics combined with nuclear theories became Dalí's source of stylistic inspiration. The theoretical corpus from this period culminates with the publication of his Mystical Manifesto. Dalí declared that there was an unexpected poetry in the integration and disintegration of the atom, to the extent that he began to atomise and disintegrate his compositions, as we can see in the work Maximum Speed of Raphael's Madonna.

    Try disintegrating a work that you like into spherical atoms. You will almost certainly find the unexpected poetry Dalí talked about.

    For further information

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    683
    Year:
    c. 1954
    Tecnique:
    Oil on Canvas
    Dimensions:
    81 x 66 cm
    Collection:
    Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid

    To feed his passionate interest in science that we have mentioned, Dalí took out subscriptions to different scientific journals which kept him up-to-date with all the various studies that were conducted in his day. Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 683

    Dalí Dixit

    “The atomic explosion of August 6, 1945 shook me seismically. Thenceforth, the atom was my favorite food for thought. Many of the landscapes painted in this period express the great fear inspired in me by the announcement of that explosion.”

    André Parinaud, Salvador Dalí Comment on devient Dalí, 1973.

    “Galatea the Galanymph of pure and gigantic marine geology, is slowly but ineluctably taking shape in the Raphaelite-nuclear impulse of my next and brilliant painting.”

    Salvador Dalí Journal d’un génie. La Table Ronde, Paris, 1964.

  • Microphysical Madonna
    © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres, 2018

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    685
    Year:
    c. 1954
    Tecnique:
    Oil on Canvas
    Dimensions:
    24.5 x 18.7 cm
    Collection:
    Private collection

    We have already talked about Dalí's keen interest in some treatises on architecture, particularly the one written by Luca Pacioli, in which he explains the golden ratio, also known as the divine proportion. Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 685

    Obres de referència

    Madonna of the Goldfinch

    Su concessione del Ministerio dei Beni e le Attività Culturali. La riproduzione, copia totale o parziale, duplicazione della immagine è espressamente vietata.

    Madonna of the goldfinch, 1507
    Galleria degli Uffizi, Firenze

    Dalí Dixit

    "The rhinoceros is the only animal that has a perfect logarithmic curve on the end of its nose. That interests me. Leonardo da Vinci studied the sunflower, and I have studied the cauliflower; one day I went to give a lecture at the Sorbonne in a Rolls Royce filled with cauliflowers. It was totally outrageous".

    Michaël DelMar, Salvador Dalí, “Astroview”, Façade, Paris, 1978

    Educa Dalí

    The Fibonacci spiral is the perfect logarithmic shape found in the golden ratio. You can see this feature in the shape of sunflower seeds, cauliflowers, the shells of marine animals, artichoke flowers, rhinoceros horns, sea urchins, etc. If you look closely, the repeated incorporation of all these elements in Dalí's work is no coincidence.

    Look for the perfect spiral in the natural elements around you: you will be surprised to find them everywhere.

    For further information

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    685
    Year:
    c. 1954
    Tecnique:
    Oil on Canvas
    Dimensions:
    24.5 x 18.7 cm
    Collection:
    Private collection

    We have already talked about Dalí's keen interest in some treatises on architecture, particularly the one written by Luca Pacioli, in which he explains the golden ratio, also known as the divine proportion. Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 685

    Dalí Dixit

    "The rhinoceros is the only animal that has a perfect logarithmic curve on the end of its nose. That interests me. Leonardo da Vinci studied the sunflower, and I have studied the cauliflower; one day I went to give a lecture at the Sorbonne in a Rolls Royce filled with cauliflowers. It was totally outrageous".

    Michaël DelMar, Salvador Dalí, “Astroview”, Façade, Paris, 1978

  • The Ascension of Saint Cecilia
    © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres, 2018

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    706
    Year:
    c. 1955
    Tecnique:
    Oil on canvas
    Dimensions:
    81.5 x 66.5 cm
    Collection:
    Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres

    In this painting Salvador Dalí tackles the great religious theme of ascension. At first glance you might be forgiven for thinking that the canvas is covered exclusively in rhinoceros horns, but if you look carefully at the centre of the composition you will see the figure of a woman hiding there, and not just any woman, but Raphael's Saint Catherine of Alexandria, from 1507. Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 706

    Obres de referència

    Saint Catherine of Alexandria

    © The National Gallery, London

    Saint Catherine of Alexandria, c. 1507
    The National Gallery, London

    Dalí Dixit

    "I have discovered that in Raphael one can see very noticeably in the neck, in the shape of the neck, I have analysed it, that everything is formed, just like these angles, from cubes and cylinders; Raphael painted only with profiles, shapes closely resembling the logarithmic curves that are found in a rhinoceros horn".

    Salvador Dalí, “Aspects phénoménologiques de la méthode paranoïaque critique. Conférence en Sorbonne”, La Vie Médicale, Paris, Décembre 1956.

    'What is important is that we must paint the subjects in a way that corresponds to the time we live in, 1951; this means that if Raphael painted a virgin according to the cosmogony of the Renaissance, today this cosmogony has varied. The same subject that Raphael painted, if Raphael painted it today, because he would have other knowledge (nuclear physics, psychoanalysis, for example), he would paint as well as then, but he would respond to today's cosmogony. And the religious theme is, for me, the oldest and the most current; but it must be treated according to the scientific knowledge of our time [...].'

    Manuel del Arco, Salvador Dalí, Dalí al desnudo, 1952.

    "It is untrue that I hold myself to be the greatest painter in the world, as people have said. Painting, for me, is only one of the most imperfect manifestations of my intelligence. I am a terrible painter. If I compare my canvases with those of the Renaissance, with Raphael's works, for example, I am aware that all of my work is a total disaster. But this does not prevent me from being, thanks to my style, one of today's greatest artists".

    S.a., Salvador Dalí, Une interview exceptionnelle Dalí se confesse, Arts, n. 674, Paris, 11/06/1958

    Educa Dalí

    We can see how, in the process of creating the painting The Ascension of Saint Cecilia, Dalí used a traced copy of the work by Raphael. Dalí had absolutely no qualms about copying the classics; in fact, he admired them enormously and, in comparison with them, considered himself a very modest painter.

    For further information

    Publifoto: Dalí's oil painting The Ascension of Saint Cecilia with a reproduction of Raphael's Saint Catherine of Alexandria in his studio at Portlligat, ca. 1955. Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres.
    Publifoto

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    706
    Year:
    c. 1955
    Tecnique:
    Oil on canvas
    Dimensions:
    81.5 x 66.5 cm
    Collection:
    Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres

    In this painting Salvador Dalí tackles the great religious theme of ascension. At first glance you might be forgiven for thinking that the canvas is covered exclusively in rhinoceros horns, but if you look carefully at the centre of the composition you will see the figure of a woman hiding there, and not just any woman, but Raphael's Saint Catherine of Alexandria, from 1507. Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 706

    Dalí Dixit

    "I have discovered that in Raphael one can see very noticeably in the neck, in the shape of the neck, I have analysed it, that everything is formed, just like these angles, from cubes and cylinders; Raphael painted only with profiles, shapes closely resembling the logarithmic curves that are found in a rhinoceros horn".

    Salvador Dalí, “Aspects phénoménologiques de la méthode paranoïaque critique. Conférence en Sorbonne”, La Vie Médicale, Paris, Décembre 1956.

    'What is important is that we must paint the subjects in a way that corresponds to the time we live in, 1951; this means that if Raphael painted a virgin according to the cosmogony of the Renaissance, today this cosmogony has varied. The same subject that Raphael painted, if Raphael painted it today, because he would have other knowledge (nuclear physics, psychoanalysis, for example), he would paint as well as then, but he would respond to today's cosmogony. And the religious theme is, for me, the oldest and the most current; but it must be treated according to the scientific knowledge of our time [...].'

    Manuel del Arco, Salvador Dalí, Dalí al desnudo, 1952.

    "It is untrue that I hold myself to be the greatest painter in the world, as people have said. Painting, for me, is only one of the most imperfect manifestations of my intelligence. I am a terrible painter. If I compare my canvases with those of the Renaissance, with Raphael's works, for example, I am aware that all of my work is a total disaster. But this does not prevent me from being, thanks to my style, one of today's greatest artists".

    S.a., Salvador Dalí, Une interview exceptionnelle Dalí se confesse, Arts, n. 674, Paris, 11/06/1958

    For further information

    Publifoto: Dalí's oil painting The Ascension of Saint Cecilia with a reproduction of Raphael's Saint Catherine of Alexandria in his studio at Portlligat, ca. 1955. Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres.
    Publifoto

  • Antimatter Ear. Madonna
    © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres, 2018 Photo © 1987 The Metropolitan Museum of Art

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    734
    Year:
    1958
    Tecnique:
    Oil on canvas
    Dimensions:
    225.7 x 191.1 cm
    Collection:
    The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Nova York

    In 1958, Dalí wrote The Antimatter Manifesto, in which he states that his iconographic world no longer explores the internal realm of the surrealist period with constant references to Sigmund Freud (1856-1939, neurologist, father of psychoanalysis), but instead focuses on exploring the external world, the world of physics. Dalí declared that the new father of this science was Doctor Heisenberg, the physicist who developed the uncertainty principle, according to which it is impossible to know both the velocity and the position of a particle at the same time. Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 734

    Obres de referència

    Sistine Madonna

    © bpk-Bildagentur

    Sistine Madonna, 1512
    Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister, Dresden

    Dalí Dixit

    “Just as it had been easy for me, since Señor Traite's school, to repeat the experience of seeing «anything I wished» in the moisture Stains on the vaults, and as I was able later to repeat this experience in the forms of the moving clouds of the summer storm at the Muli de la Torre, so even at the beginning of my adolescence this magic power of transforming the world beyond the limits of «visual images» burst thorough to the sentimental domains of my own life, so that I became master of that thaumaturgical faculty of being able to any moment and in any circumstance always, always to see something else, or on the other hand-what amounts to the same- «always to see the identical thing» in things that were different.”

    Salvador Dalí, The Secret Life of Salvador Dalí, 1942

    Educa Dalí

    From early childhood, Dalí was fascinated by visual games and optical illusions. When he was at primary school, his teacher, Esteve Trayter, would show his pupils various lenses and optical devices. Young Dalí was astonished, and this experience made a huge impression on the way he saw reality, something which would remain with him for the rest of his life.

    For further information

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    734
    Year:
    1958
    Tecnique:
    Oil on canvas
    Dimensions:
    225.7 x 191.1 cm
    Collection:
    The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Nova York

    In 1958, Dalí wrote The Antimatter Manifesto, in which he states that his iconographic world no longer explores the internal realm of the surrealist period with constant references to Sigmund Freud (1856-1939, neurologist, father of psychoanalysis), but instead focuses on exploring the external world, the world of physics. Dalí declared that the new father of this science was Doctor Heisenberg, the physicist who developed the uncertainty principle, according to which it is impossible to know both the velocity and the position of a particle at the same time. Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 734

    Dalí Dixit

    “Just as it had been easy for me, since Señor Traite's school, to repeat the experience of seeing «anything I wished» in the moisture Stains on the vaults, and as I was able later to repeat this experience in the forms of the moving clouds of the summer storm at the Muli de la Torre, so even at the beginning of my adolescence this magic power of transforming the world beyond the limits of «visual images» burst thorough to the sentimental domains of my own life, so that I became master of that thaumaturgical faculty of being able to any moment and in any circumstance always, always to see something else, or on the other hand-what amounts to the same- «always to see the identical thing» in things that were different.”

    Salvador Dalí, The Secret Life of Salvador Dalí, 1942

  • Cosmic madonna

    Cosmic madonna

    c. 1958

    Cosmic madonna
    © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres, 2018

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    746
    Year:
    c. 1958
    Tecnique:
    Oil on canvas
    Dimensions:
    152.4 x 91.4 cm
    Collection:
    Private Collection

    Raphael's Sistine Madonna is reproduced in numerous works by Dalí, and Cosmic Madonna is another example of this. The subtitle of the painting again refers us to the theme of the ear, but this time it is Van Gogh's ear, and not an angel's. Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 746

    Obres de referència

    Sistine Madonna

    © bpk-Bildagentur

    Sistine Madonna 1512
    Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister, Dresden

    Dalí Dixit

    “The idea of the angel stimulates me. For if God is outside our ken, He is cosmic because without limits; but angels have shapes. Proton and neutron to me are angelic elements. Raphael and St. John of the Cross are close to the angels. I try to approach the angelic world through the hyperesthetic paranoia-critical chastity and spirituality of these illustrations. This is my discipline for getting to heaven.”

    André Parinaud, Salvador Dalí, Comment on devient Dalí, 1973.

    Educa Dalí

    Angels appear frequently in Raphael's paintings, and also in Dalí's work. Those painted by Salvador Dalí evolve to the point of being portrayed in the shape of wash-basins, like the ones we can see in the courtyard of the Dalí Theatre-Museum in Figueres. These pieces are known as ready-mades -ordinary objects from everyday life chosen by the artist and then decontextualised and placed in a different setting, where they acquire a new poetic meaning- and are, at the same time, a nod to his friend and admired artist Marcel Duchamp (1887-1962), creator of the ready-made Fountain (1917).

    For further information

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    746
    Year:
    c. 1958
    Tecnique:
    Oil on canvas
    Dimensions:
    152.4 x 91.4 cm
    Collection:
    Private Collection

    Raphael's Sistine Madonna is reproduced in numerous works by Dalí, and Cosmic Madonna is another example of this. The subtitle of the painting again refers us to the theme of the ear, but this time it is Van Gogh's ear, and not an angel's. Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 746

    Dalí Dixit

    “The idea of the angel stimulates me. For if God is outside our ken, He is cosmic because without limits; but angels have shapes. Proton and neutron to me are angelic elements. Raphael and St. John of the Cross are close to the angels. I try to approach the angelic world through the hyperesthetic paranoia-critical chastity and spirituality of these illustrations. This is my discipline for getting to heaven.”

    André Parinaud, Salvador Dalí, Comment on devient Dalí, 1973.

  • The Virgin of Guadalupe
    © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres, 2018

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    748
    Year:
    1958
    Tecnique:
    Oil on canvas
    Dimensions:
    200 x 130 cm
    Collection:
    Private Collection

    This painting shows us how the face of the Sistine Madonna by Raphael turns into the face of Gala. Both are rocking the baby Jesus in the same way; Dalí painted The Virgin of Guadalupe with the characteristically soft, fine and harmonious shapes found in Raphael's paintings. Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 748

    Obres de referència

    Sistine Madonna

    © bpk-Bildagentur

    Sistine Madonna, 1512
    Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister, Dresden

    Dalí Dixit

    “Raphael said that in order to make a successful picture one should think about anything else while manipulating the brush. His studios abounded with beautiful people intertwined, singers, musicians, poets who were reciting their verses. When evening comes, and you step back to look at your canvas, be surprised at what was born of your fingers. May the best of you rise above automatism, while your thoughts are sailing on a thousand variegated currents, changing, incessantly interesting, deliriously hazardous navigation from one unexpected isle to another.”

    Louis Pauwels, Salvador Dalí, Les Passions selon Dalí, 1968.

    Educa Dalí

    In his book 50 Secrets of Magic Craftsmanship, Dalí provides a series of tips and trades for painters and artists. Look at the ten rules Dalí proposes for budding artists and try creating your own top ten tips.

    Look at the ten rules Dalí proposes for budding artists and try creating your own top ten tips.

    Ten rules for anyone who wishes ti be a painter

    1. Painter, it is better to be rich than poor; so learn how to make gold and precious stones come out of your brush.
    2. Don't be afraid of perfection: you'll never attain it!
    3. Begin by learning to draw and paint like the old masters. After that, you can do as you like; everyone will respect you.
    4. Don't throw to the dogs either your eye or your hand or your brain, for you will need them all if you are to be a painter.
    5. If you are one of those who believe that modern art has surpassed Vermeer and Raphael, don't read this book, just go right on in your blissful idiocy.
    6. Don't vomit on your picture, because it is the picture which can vomit on you after you are dead.
    7. No lazy masterpieces!
    8. Painter, paint!
    9. Painter don't drink alcohol, and chew hashish only five times in your life.
    10. If painting doesn't love you, all your love for her will be unavailing.”

    Salvador Dalí, 50 secrets of magic craftsmanship, 1948.

    For further information

    Salvador Dalí, page of the manuscript of 50 Secrets of Magic Craftsmanship with the table of comparative values, ca. 1947. Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres.

    © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres, 2018

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    748
    Year:
    1958
    Tecnique:
    Oil on canvas
    Dimensions:
    200 x 130 cm
    Collection:
    Private Collection

    This painting shows us how the face of the Sistine Madonna by Raphael turns into the face of Gala. Both are rocking the baby Jesus in the same way; Dalí painted The Virgin of Guadalupe with the characteristically soft, fine and harmonious shapes found in Raphael's paintings. Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 748

    Dalí Dixit

    “Raphael said that in order to make a successful picture one should think about anything else while manipulating the brush. His studios abounded with beautiful people intertwined, singers, musicians, poets who were reciting their verses. When evening comes, and you step back to look at your canvas, be surprised at what was born of your fingers. May the best of you rise above automatism, while your thoughts are sailing on a thousand variegated currents, changing, incessantly interesting, deliriously hazardous navigation from one unexpected isle to another.”

    Louis Pauwels, Salvador Dalí, Les Passions selon Dalí, 1968.

    For further information

    Salvador Dalí, page of the manuscript of 50 Secrets of Magic Craftsmanship with the table of comparative values, ca. 1947. Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres.

    © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres, 2018

  • Battle in the Clouds
    © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres, 2018

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    860
    Year:
    c. 1979
    Tecnique:
    Oil on Canvas
    Dimensions:
    100 x 100 cm Left Element
    100 x 100 cm Right Element
    Collection:
    Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid

    While we find that most of Raphael's influence on Dalí's work is reflected in his Madonnas, in this case we see how he took a scene from the work Battle of Constantine against Maxentius and reproduced the bodies and movements of the characters. Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 860

    Obres de referència

    Battle of Constantine against Maxentius

    Foto Copyright © Musei Vaticani

    Battle of Constantine against Maxentius 1520-1524
    Musei vaticani, Rome

    Dalí Dixit

    “JM: "How has your painting method evolved?"

    SD: "During the surrealist period in the 1930s, my painting was pure imaginative automatism. Now it is different: I use a photographic technique. Each picture is defined in advance by a perfectly geometrical structure. Currently I am painting stereoscopic pictures, using two mirrors that reflect each photograph. In this way, I obtain unique visions and colours. To sum up, before I painted the fantasy of reality. Today, I paint the reality of fantasy...".
     

    Jacques Michel, Salvador Dalí, "Salvador Dalí et son musée", Le Monde, Paris, 03/10/1974

    Educa Dalí

    Stereoscopy is the result of viewing two almost identical images side by side. Each eye looks at one of the images, and the brain merges them, producing a sensation of depth, relief, and three dimensions.

    Excited by this technique, Dalí made pairs of paintings that look identical, but are not. He slightly shifts the centre of each image in relation to the viewer's eyes and modifies the colours of both. In this way, when looking at both pictures at the same time we see a single three-dimensional image with depth.

    For further information

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    860
    Year:
    c. 1979
    Tecnique:
    Oil on Canvas
    Dimensions:
    100 x 100 cm Left Element
    100 x 100 cm Right Element
    Collection:
    Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid

    While we find that most of Raphael's influence on Dalí's work is reflected in his Madonnas, in this case we see how he took a scene from the work Battle of Constantine against Maxentius and reproduced the bodies and movements of the characters. Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 860

    Dalí Dixit

    “JM: "How has your painting method evolved?"

    SD: "During the surrealist period in the 1930s, my painting was pure imaginative automatism. Now it is different: I use a photographic technique. Each picture is defined in advance by a perfectly geometrical structure. Currently I am painting stereoscopic pictures, using two mirrors that reflect each photograph. In this way, I obtain unique visions and colours. To sum up, before I painted the fantasy of reality. Today, I paint the reality of fantasy...".
     

    Jacques Michel, Salvador Dalí, "Salvador Dalí et son musée", Le Monde, Paris, 03/10/1974

    For further information

  • After “The School of Athens” and “The Fire in the Borgo” by Raphael. Stereoscopic Work
    © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres, 2018 Photo © 1987 The Metropolitan Museum of Art

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    896
    Year:
    c. 1979
    Tecnique:
    Oil on plywood panel
    Dimensions:
    32 x 43 cm Left Element
    32 x 43 cm Right Element
    Collection:
    Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres

    The School of Athens and The Fire in the Borgo are two of Raphael's most famous frescoes. The paintings are found in the Raphael Rooms of the Vatican Museums, which at the time were a suite of apartments for Pope Julius II (1503-1513). Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 896

    Obres de referència

    The School of Athens

    Foto Copyright © Musei Vaticani

    The School of Athens c. 1509-1511
    Musei Vaticani, Roma

    The Fire in the Borgo

    Foto Copyright © Musei Vaticani

    The Fire of the Borgo 1514
    Musei Vaticani, Roma

    Dalí Dixit

    "Another new interest in Dalí's life is holography, which will also be present in the Dalí Museum: it is the total third dimension, based on information and light interference, which enable visual reality to be reproduced with all its problems and wonderful possibilities. This is the work of Dennis Gabor, who won a Nobel Prize and who I have been fortunate enough to meet. I made five holograms with him, which is the most modern thing one can do, and they are the first to be created by an artist. The museum in Figueres will have the privilege of being able to exhibit, for the first time, one of these holograms. Thus, my wish is that this will be an ultra-local museum, which is what will make it possible to become universal".

    Xian de Andrade, Salvador Dalí, “Dalí, sus dos caras y su museo”, Sábado Gráfico, Madrid, 17/06/1972.

    Educa Dalí

    Dalí's interest in recreating depth and the third dimension led him to collaborate with the holder of the Nobel Prize in Physics Dennis Gabor (1900-1979) to create the first artistic hologram in history. They would go on to produce different holographic pieces that recreated totally innovative works in three dimensions. Holography techniques are extremely complex, and with these works Dalí once again became a pioneer in his field.

    For further information

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    896
    Year:
    c. 1979
    Tecnique:
    Oil on plywood panel
    Dimensions:
    32 x 43 cm Left Element
    32 x 43 cm Right Element
    Collection:
    Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres

    The School of Athens and The Fire in the Borgo are two of Raphael's most famous frescoes. The paintings are found in the Raphael Rooms of the Vatican Museums, which at the time were a suite of apartments for Pope Julius II (1503-1513). Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 896

    Dalí Dixit

    "Another new interest in Dalí's life is holography, which will also be present in the Dalí Museum: it is the total third dimension, based on information and light interference, which enable visual reality to be reproduced with all its problems and wonderful possibilities. This is the work of Dennis Gabor, who won a Nobel Prize and who I have been fortunate enough to meet. I made five holograms with him, which is the most modern thing one can do, and they are the first to be created by an artist. The museum in Figueres will have the privilege of being able to exhibit, for the first time, one of these holograms. Thus, my wish is that this will be an ultra-local museum, which is what will make it possible to become universal".

    Xian de Andrade, Salvador Dalí, “Dalí, sus dos caras y su museo”, Sábado Gráfico, Madrid, 17/06/1972.

  • In Search of the Fourth Dimension
    © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres, 2018

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    908
    Year:
    c. 1979
    Tecnique:
    Oil on Canvas
    Dimensions:
    122.5 x 246 cm
    Collection:
    Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres

    In this enigmatic painting we find different dalinian elements from the past and present, merged together with various artistic references within the space-time continuum. Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 908

    Obres de referència

    The School of Athens

    Foto Copyright © Musei Vaticani

    The School of Athens c. 1509-1511
    Musei Vaticani, Rome

    Educa Dalí

    The title of this piece In Search of the Fourth Dimension reveals Dalí's great interest in exploring a new dimension that incorporated the space-time continuum, a subject we see reflected in several of his works.

    Above all, we can see it developed in the figure of the hypercube, which would be the geometrical representation of a cube in the fourth dimension. A space in four dimensions or 4D is a mathematical extension of the concept of three-dimensional space or 3D. A three-dimensional space is the simplest generalisation possible of observation, in which only three numbers -or dimensions- are required to describe the measurements or locations of objects in our daily world. For example, the volume of a cube can be calculated by measuring its length, width and depth.

    In turn, space in four dimensions incorporates the same variables we find in three-dimensional space and, in addition, the space-time continuum. This may all sound rather complicated, but it is normal! The 4D concept is totally alien to us because we are used to representing our world in the three physical dimensions.

    For further information

    • Elliot H. King. Liquid Desires. NGV: Melbourne

    Description

    Cat. no.:
    908
    Year:
    c. 1979
    Tecnique:
    Oil on Canvas
    Dimensions:
    122.5 x 246 cm
    Collection:
    Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Figueres

    In this enigmatic painting we find different dalinian elements from the past and present, merged together with various artistic references within the space-time continuum. Read more

    Veure fitxa núm. cat. 908

    For further information

    • Elliot H. King. Liquid Desires. NGV: Melbourne
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